pete&sonwelcome
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Producing Quality Fire Wood

 

Firewood Ratings

Species BTU's Output Rating Smoke
Hard Maple 26.9 million High Excellent Light
Ash 24.3 million High Excellent Light
Oak 24 million High Excellent Light
Beech 22.2 million High Excellent Light
Birch 21.1 million High Excellent Light
Soft Maple 18.9 million Medium Good Light

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Justifying the Cost

Species Heat Output Per Dry Cord Equivalent of Heating Propane Equivalent of Heating Oil
Hard Maple 26.9 million BTU's 280.50 gallons @ $1.84 = $516.12 188.64 gallons @ $3.33 = $628.17
Ash 24.3 million BTU's 253.39 gallons @ $1.84 = $466.24 170.41 gallons @ $3.33 = $567.47
Oak 24 million BTU's 250.26 gallons @ $1.84 = $460.47 168.30 gallons @ $3.33 = $560.44
Beech 22.2 million BTU's 231.49 gallons @ $1.84 = $425.94 155.68 gallons @ $3.33 = $518.41
Birch 21.1 million BTU's 220.02 gallons @ $1.84 = $404.84 147.97 gallons @ $3.33 = $492.74
Soft Maple 18.9 million BTU's 197.08 gallons @ $1.84 = $362.63 132.54 gallons @ $3.33 = $441.36

Form the information provided in the above chart shows that the harder and denser the wood is the more BTU's you are going to receive from burning it, like your oaks, ash, & hard maple. The heat content of any fire will depend on the woods density, ash, resin, and moisture. Generally the hardwoods will provide long burning fires that contain the greatest heating value per unit.

Softwoods such as pine, spruce, and poplar, do not burn as hot as the hardwoods , therefore they can leave behind un-burned wood creosote. The wood creosote can also be referred to as coal tar that can build up carbon in chimneys from wood burning fires, increasing the risk of a chimney fire. These softwoods are also fast burning, less dense, and contain less total heat value per unit while dry woodyardhaving a crackling blaze.

Allowing our wood to be dried for a period of 1 year provides a lower moisture content and creating a more efficient burn. There are two important numbers to remember when it come to moisture content; 19% and 28%.

19% moisture content = the wood is dry.

28% moisture content = benchmark fiber saturation for decay and shrinkage.